Tag Archives: Conservative Friends of Israel

David Cameron Tells Britains Jews: Stop Tolerating Extremists

David Cameron should be using his muscular liberalism to condemn the coming together of extremist groups like the English Defence League, foreign Rabbi’s and the Tea Party who have made Islam their number one target.

Come on Dave, show us your muscles and take some action.

The headlines this weekend were all variations of:

“David Cameron tells Muslim Britain: stop tolerating extremists”

Substitute the word Muslim for Jew or Black, you’d never stand it for it, so why is it OK to tar two million Muslims in this country with the extremist tag?

When the Conservative party chair, Sayeeda Warsi, came out and stated that prejudice against Muslims has “passed the dinner-table test” and become socially acceptable in the UK, perhaps she was referring to the racists and Islamophobes within her party.

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David “I’m A Zionist” Cameron Runs Off To Germany & Attacks British Muslims

The Bullingdon buffoon David “I’m a zionist” Cameron scuttled off to Munich to attack British Muslims, giving the English Defence League the credence they crave, on the very day the racist EDL continue their assault on Muslims in Luton.

Perhaps the most telling statement he made was:

“This ignores that fact that many of those found guilty of terrorist offences in the UK have been graduates, and often middle class. They point to the grievances about Western foreign policy and say: stop riding roughshod over Muslim countries and the terrorism will end. But there are many people – Muslim and non-Muslim alike – who are angry about western foreign policy and don’t resort to acts of terrorism. They also point to the profusion of unelected leaders across the Middle East and say: stop propping them up and creating the conditions for extremism to flourish.

But this raises the question: if a lack of democracy is the problem, why are there extremists in free and open societies?

Yes, we must resolve sources of tension – not least in Palestine.

And yes, we should be on the side of openness and political reform in the Middle East.”

The Akh agrees with LondonMuslim that this is no attack on Multiculturalism or as others will seek to highlight about a new concept called “muscular liberalism” “what’s that then – Clegg and Cable on steroids?). The reality is this speech which was probably written by Israelite Michael Gove is actually a grotesque racist attack on normal decent Muslims going about their everyday business in Cameron’s collapsing society yet sadly being tarred with the same brush as a small but vociferous bunch of extremist fruitcakes.

The issue of immigration is embedded in the DNA of Tory closet racists the new test is when Tories talk of Muslims you can be sure that they are in serious political trouble while talk of dinner table Islamophobia by Sayeeda Warsi was a temporary diversion.

Lets be clear we need no lectures from Cameron and his fellow bunch of Eton boys. Muslims increasingly are tacking the extremists within our community unlike Cameron who remains silent when Tory Councillors abuse Muslims. Cameron while you revert to Maggies tone about the UK being “swamped” or Michael Howards “are you thinking what we are thinking”, the reality is Muslims today in Luton are victims and on the receiving end of a violent riot.

Not all Muslims are extremists, blah, blah, blah….but just throw enough mud at the religion to curry favour with reactionary populist sentiment on the subject to deflect from the right royal screwing you’re giving them through cutbacks in services and jobs and massively hiking their cost of living.

Also, why make a speech about the UK in Munich and not here?

Why make such a speech on the day the EDL are holding their biggest march?

‘This terrorism is indiscriminate and thrust upon us’ – Nothing to do with Western foreign policy over decades then, just them picking on us for no reason?

‘Our way of life is at stake’ – Our way of life is more at threat from this coalition government than by any extremists.

In The Spectator, Peter Oborne writes that the Neocons in The Conservative Party are winning the argument about how to deal with Muslims.

Where’s the divide?

The British debate about political Islam is catastrophically muddled 29 January 2011

The outcry over Sayeeda Warsi’s speech on Islamophobia last week cannot be understood without a clear grasp of the balance of power within the coalition government. There are two factions, and the strongest can loosely be described as neoconservative.

This faction remains an unconditional supporter of the United States of America, continues to defend the Iraq invasion, powerfully admires and in some cases worships Tony Blair, and automatically takes the side of Israel in the middle east.

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Israel declares war on its people – The result of the “Citizenship” oath.

I reported on how Israel was forcing it’s Muslim, Christian and all non Jewish citizens to undertake an oath to the Jewish nation. I followed this up yesterday with the dire consequences this so called “law of citizenship” would have.

I want you all to see exactly what happens when the people refuse to abide by these fascist laws.

Israeli forces have razed the Bedouin village of Al Arakib in the north Negev five times since last July, sparking cries of ethnic cleansing and leaving more than 300 Bedouin homeless.

But determined residents, along with a handful of Jewish activists, continue to rebuild.

The government claims that Al Arakib was abandoned and, as such, belongs to the state. Israel calls the Bedouin squatters who “infiltrate” the area and settle it illegally. According to the state, these people must be removed to make way for a forest to be planted by the Jewish National Fund.

It calls the Bedouin “squatters” who “infiltrate” the area and settle it illegally.

Villagers, some of whom hold Ottoman-era deeds to the property, say that the Israeli army asked them to leave temporarily in 1951. Believing that they would be able to move back, they left.

But the Bedouin continued to cultivate the village land, harvesting pomegranates, olive and other produce. And more than a decade ago, they rooted themselves in Al Arakib once again, building houses and families.

Just days before the village was destroyed for the first time, Binyamin Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister, spoke of his fears of the Negev becoming “a region without a Jewish majority”.

Oren Yiftachel, a geography and urban studies professor, says the plight of the residents of Al Arakib “serves as a reminder that citizenship in Israel is very unequal”.

This story is emblematic of the Palestinian struggle; it also touches on questions about Israel’s treatment of it’s non-Jewish citizens.

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Israel’s “law of citizenship” will have dire consequences

The definition of Israel as “Jewish and democratic” already means that the ethnically cleansed Palestinian minority are confirmed as being second-class citizens under the apartheid regime in Tel Aviv. Following on from last weeks’ piece “I declare loyalty to the Jewish state, its leaders & commanders of the Jewish army” I decided to see what the real consequences of this loyalty oath would mean.

On Sunday 10 October, the Israeli cabinet voted in favour of an amendment to the country’s “Law of Citizenship”, supporting a proposal that would require non-Jews seeking to become citizens to swear allegiance to Israel as a “Jewish and democratic” state. This comes at a time when the Prime Minister, Binyamin Netanyahu, continues to insist that Palestinians must “recognise Israel as a Jewish state” in the context of the faltering negotiations.

One of the reasons for the Palestinian rejection of this demand is the situation of the Palestinian minority in Israel (around 20 per cent). By coincidence, just two days before the cabinet vote, Human Rights Watch (HRW) issued a press release on the plight of Dahmash, an “unrecognised” Palestinian village 20km from Tel Aviv, sandwiched between Lod and Ramle. Here in microcosm is what Israel “as a Jewish state” has always meant for its Palestinian minority.

Dahmash has been inhabited since at least 1951, and its residents are Israeli citizens. Yet Israeli authorities “refuse to rezone the land as residential” — despite doing so for land nearby — and “refuse to provide basic services such as paved roads, sewage, health facilities, kindergartens, and schools”. Moreover, “the authorities consider almost every one of the 70 houses ‘illegal’, and 13 are under threat of demolition”.

The people in Dahmash are thus faced with the same daily emergency as the tens of thousands of Palestinians living in “unrecognised villages” in Israel, as I saw for myself when I visited in July.

Ironically, some of Dahmash’s residents were given the land by the state “as compensation for lands from which they had been displaced” in 1948 “to which the Israeli government prohibited them from returning”. Since then, however, officials have refused to “zone Dahmash for residential construction”.

“Many towns and neighbourhoods in central Israel, including the new residential development bordering Dahmash, were also originally zoned for agricultural use, but authorities rezoned those lands to allow them to expand and created plans that permitted residential construction. Neither regional nor national authorities have provided such a plan for Dahmash. In the last few years both Ramle and Lod have constructed residential complexes restricted to military career personnel and religious Jews.”

The case of Dahmash highlights the important role played by both national and local planning mechanisms in maintaining Israel’s regime of control and segregation. In the words of HRW’s deputy Middle East director, “the 600 people of Dahmash are treated as if they don’t exist, while Jewish towns are developed nearby in a way that threatens Dahmash residents’ access to their homes and lands”.

Nor is Dahmash is an isolated case. In a recent Ha’aretz article on the Galilee, we read how “the goals of the hilltop Jewish communities” in the region — according to a member of the Jewish Agency hilltop planning team — are “to prevent Arabs from ‘taking over’ government lands, keep Arab villages from attaining territorial continuity and attract a ‘strong’ population to the Galilee”.

Twenty-nine Jewish communities, most of them cooperative, were built in Misgav from 1978-1988. The regional council also includes six existing Bedouin communities, whose conditions are light years removed from the Jewish ones. The Arab towns in the area do not belong to the council.

But it’s not just a problem of land zoning for existing communities: as HRW describes, since 1948 “more than 900 Jewish villages and cities have been established in Israel, while the only new Arab towns allowed in 60 years have been seven towns that the government planned and constructed for Bedouin residents of the Negev”. In a country that presents itself as the region’s only democracy, the only new Arab towns in 60 years are half a dozen townships built as part of a “relocation” drive.

Ramle’s mayor, Yoel Lavi, “who sits on the planning committee that rejected Dahmash’s [alternative zoning] plan, told Israeli television in 2004 that the Maccabi District was not meant for Arabs because allowing Palestinian-Israeli citizens to live there would ‘harm the ability to market the project since people won’t want to live there’.” In 2006, Lavi explained his own “solution” to the unrecognised village of Dahmash:

“take two D10 bulldozers, the kind the IDF uses in the Golan Heights, two border police units to secure the area, and go from one side to the other […] when you give the first shock with the crane everyone runs from their houses, don’t worry.”

That day has not come for Dahmash — but it is rather reminiscent of scenes in Al-Arakib in the Negev, where just last week the village was destroyed for the sixth time this year. While the current trends in the Knesset are certainly troubling, the example of Dahmash highlights what “Jewish and democratic” has long meant for Palestinians living as second-class citizens in their own land.

Source: Ben White, New Statesman

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“I declare loyalty to the Jewish state, its leaders & commanders of the Jewish army”

“I swear by Hashem [the Jewish God] that I want to offer unconditional loyalty to the Jewish state of Israel, to its leaders and the commanders of its Jewish army. I am prepared as a loyal supporter of the Jewish state to risk my life for this oath at any time.”

The above is the oath of loyalty to the Jewish state that Israeli subjects read on camera.

“I swear by God this holy oath, that I want to offer unconditional obedience to the Fuhrer of the German Empire and people, Adolf Hitler, the commander-in-chief of the Wehrmacht, and be prepared as a brave soldier to risk my life for this oath at any time.”

The above is the oath of allegiance of the German Forces, called Reichswehr from 1919 to 1935, and then Wehrmacht until 1945 in Nazi Germany.

I am totally convinced that the Nazis could have learned a lot from these loyal “Jews”.

The Israeli Knesset is debating a bill proposed by David Rotem of the extreme right Yisrael Beiteinu party that would require all Israeli citizens to swear loyalty to Israel as a “Jewish and democratic state.” This bill is targeted at increasing pressure on the 20 percent of Israelis who are Palestinian citizens, while forcing the ultra-Orthodox Jewish minority who reject the legitimacy of any state not based on Jewish biblical law to accept Zionism. If passed in its proposed form, citizens unwilling to take the loyalty oath would be at risk of losing citizenship.

Issues to do with loyalty are of the essence within Jewish political discourse.

Since loyalty is crucial within the Zionist discourse we may want to extend our study and challenge those who identify and operate politically as Jews to tell us about their loyalty. I would love, for instance, to know about Lord Levy, the number one fundraiser for the Labour party at the time this party dragged us into a criminal war : who is he loyal to, Israel or Britain?

What about Jewish Chronicle writers David Aaronovitch and Nick Cohen: are they primarily loyal to this Kingdom or to the Jewish state?

I wonder because they both rallied for the Iraq war in the British national press. And what about David Miliband, who is also listed on an Israeli Propaganda site as an Israeli propaganda writer, who is he loyal to?

I guess that every member of the Labour’s, Conservative’s and Lib Dem’s Friend of Israel had better be challenged and the sooner the better.

The Israeli cabinet better decide whether they want their state to be Jewish or democratic, for the two, clearly contradict each other.

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Analysing The House of Commons debate on Gaza & Britain’s Middle East Policy 14/15 June 2010

Last week, two debates were held in the House of Commons on Britain’s Policy on Gaza and the Middle East. The Akh provides you with analysis on what was said.

This debate is being paraded as a success by the Conservative Friends of Israel because they managed to flood the debate with their members and controlled the floor.

What’s most interesting is the amount of MP’s who act as Israel’s attack dogs, who stifle any real debate with the obvious red herring of Hamas being a terrorist group, to counter any sort of criticism put towards Israel.

The Akh has taken a lengthy look at the comments made, and aims to dissect it’s true meanings, the following are excerpts of the debate in the order they were made.

The full transcript of what was said on the 14 June debate is available to read here. Whilst the debate held on the 15 June can be read here.

“Let me spell out in simple terms, but in no particular order, the Government’s aims and objectives for the middle east. We will work to resolve the Arab-Israeli conflict. The only long-term solution to the conflict is a secure Israel living alongside a sovereign and viable Palestinian state, with Jerusalem the future capital of both states, and with a fair settlement for refugees.”

Secure Israel and a viable Palestinian state – What a joke, tell you what Alistair, I’ll give you a map, and you show me where a “Viable” Palestinian state would exist. Al-Quds/Jerusalem cannot be called an Israeli capital, not now, not in the future. United Nations Security Council Resolution 478 proves this to be the case, although successive Israeli administrations since 1980 have given international law the middle finger salute.

Allow the six million plus Palestinian diaspora back to their homeland, and have a full and frank democratic election.

Hold on a second, Israel would never have that, an open election where there would be more Arab/Muslim voters then the imported russian zionists, we could never settle for that.

“Hamas might be as an expression of a movement, it also represents a repressive, authoritarian force which has had a grip on Gaza for too long and held Gilad Shalit unfairly as a hostage for too long.

Democratically elected, whilst Shalit was captured deep into Lebanese territory, remind us what Israeli tanks were doing there in the first place?

“the countries of the middle east will continue to be essential suppliers of the world’s energy needs. There is similarly mutual benefit in the flows of other trade and investments between Britain and the region. This Government will work closely to support and extend those links, facilitating trade missions and signing investment and promotion protection agreements.”

Britain’s role in the Middle=East has always been two fold – secure a cheap and plentiful energy supply and protect Israel, nothing has changed in the last 60 years.

“96 humanitarian aid workers were gunned down in different conflict zones. Why does the United Nations not demand inquiries in every other country where humanitarian aid workers are slaughtered?”

Red herring alert! Denis Macshane is Labour Friends of Israel
see how he tries to divert the pressure away from Israel – Israel isn’t the only bad guy in the world, this kind of thing happens everywhere, it’s normal – No Denis, it is not, no army sends it’s commando’s to invade a ship in the middle of international waters and then proceeds to machine gun unarmed civilians in the back of the head.

“I was asked several times in my ministerial capacity during interviews on al-Jazeera: how could I, as a Jew, undertake my role as British Minister for the middle east independently and objectively? Putting aside the appropriateness or otherwise of the question, my answer was and is straightforward. I am proud to be a friend and supporter of Israel.”

Nothing to do with your Jewishness Ivan, but your belief in humanity.

“The Labour party-in government and opposition-has long championed a two-state solution: a viable, contiguous Palestinian state alongside a secure Israel.”

Labour had 13 years in charge, what did you do?

Nothing.

Note the wording again “Secure Israel”, “Viable Palestine”.

“Does my hon. Friend agree that a good step forward would be if Israel released the substantial number of Palestinian parliamentarians who are still held in prison, several years after the election? Otherwise, the message is that democracy does not work, and it is like saying to the Palestinians, “Your leaders get arrested and taken away, and therefore you have no representation.” The anger at that in Gaza and the west bank is very serious indeed.”

First bit of sense, in this whole debate, well done Jeremy!

“Does my hon. Friend agree that Hamas, with its view that eliminating the state of Israel is a religious imperative, is a real obstacle to peace?”

More moral midgetry by another key zionist attack dog and paid up member of Labour Friends of Israel, no less the vice chair herself, Louise Ellman.

What she fails to say is that Hamas accepted a 2002 Saudi peace proposal that accepts and recognises Israel’s right to exist in a secure and peaceful manner. It is primarily Israel, as well as its allies refusing to accept the democratically elected Hamas administration as a representative that they can sit and discuss terms with.

“If any other country had behaved as Israel is behaving towards the Palestinians in the occupied territories, international action would have been taken long ago. Yes, Iran’s regime is detestable and it is important to do all we can to prevent it from acquiring nuclear weapons, but it does not have them at present and it has never invaded another country. Israel does possess nuclear weapons; it is said to have 200 warheads. It has refused to sign the non-proliferation treaty and it recently refused to attend President Obama’s conference on nuclear weapons divestment. Israel has invaded Lebanon three times. It facilitated the Sabra and Shatila massacres. It also conducted Operation Cast Lead, the Gaza blockade and the attack on the Gaza flotilla.

Let us also dispose of the distractions that impede action. It makes no difference whether the inquiry into the attack on the flotilla is conducted internally by Israel or internationally. Even an international inquiry would not change Israeli policy. The Goldstone inquiry into Operation Cast Lead had no influence at all, and Goldstone was vilified as a Jewish anti-Semite and a self-hating Jew. We have heard mention this afternoon of the dreadful situation involving Gilad Shalit, the young man who was taken into captivity four years ago this week. I feel great sorrow for his family, but he was a soldier on military duty. About 15 members of the Palestine National Council are being held without charge by the Israelis, and about 300 children are being held in prisons by the Israeli Government. It is a distraction to propose, as Tony Blair and Baroness Ashton have done, to change the terms of the Israeli blockade of Gaza. Neither of them has challenged the principle of the blockade, yet it is that principle that contravenes the Geneva convention.”

Wow!

“Israel ignores international opinion on the illegal wall that has turned towns such as Kalkilya and Bethlehem into prisons, and on the illegal checkpoints. It knows that, whatever it does, no action will follow. It has the most extremist Government it has ever had, under the most extremist Prime Minister it has ever had, and a Foreign Minister who is an avowed racist. Israel is allowed literally to get away with murder. Only punitive international action will make even the tiniest difference. That means an arms ban, and the kind of sanctions that were imposed by the senior President Bush on Yitzhak Shamir to force him to participate in international talks in Madrid.

This is a situation in which one country is holding 1.5 million people in an internal prison and 4 million other Palestinians in a form of detention, but let us be clear about this: no action will be taken against Israel. President Obama will take no action, partly because he has mid-term elections in five months’ time, and partly because the odious pressure group, AIPAC-the American Israel Public Affairs Committee-can destroy any United States politician who makes the slightest criticism of Israel. When a Republican Congressman suggested that a tiny sliver of the billions of dollars that the United States gives to Israel should be transferred to alleviate a certain amount of poverty in Africa, AIPAC labelled him an anti-Semite. That is what American politicians, including Obama, have to put up with. We could take action, however. The European Union could take action over trade agreements, for example. Let us be clear that we cannot appeal to the conscience and good will of a country that has not demonstrated that it has either quality.

The situation is now unsustainable. The more the Israelis repress, suppress and oppress the Palestinians, the more precarious the future of their state will be. I saw, as did other hon. Members when we went to Iraq this year, that the Israelis are breeding children who hate them because of their hunger and their lack of schooling, and because of the way in which they are being treated. The Israelis seem to believe that treating the people of Gaza like that is a way of weaning them away from Hamas, but it only makes them support Hamas even more. Nobody is excusing Hamas; it has done dreadful things, as I pointed out to its representatives when I was in Gaza earlier this year. The fact is, however, that the Israelis are creating a generation of children who will grow up hungry and hating them.

This Israel does not want a two-state solution, but the only alternative is a one-state solution, and the existential fact is that, before long, there will be more Palestinians than Israeli Jews. It took the Jews 2,000 years to get their homeland in what is now Israel. After 60 years in that homeland, they now risk throwing it all away.”

Now that’s impressive! A politician that actually says it how it is!

“My speech has also been informed by my visit to Gaza in March as part of a cross-party delegation led by my noble Friend, Lord David Steel. The hon. Members for Hammersmith (Mr Slaughter) and for Westminster North (Ms Buck) were also part of the delegation. For me, that visit to Gaza was one of those life-transforming experiences that crystallised the issues in my head and made me see them more clearly than I had done before.

In Gaza, 1.5 million people are being held under siege conditions. First, they are blockaded on land. We saw the wall and, more pertinently, we had to be careful not to get too close to it because of the snipers who patrol it. The people are also blockaded by air, as well as by sea, the tragic result of which we saw a couple of weekends ago. To set this in the context of my own constituency, that is the equivalent of the whole of greater Bristol, Bath and all of Wiltshire being blockaded off from the rest of the United Kingdom and denied access to the most basic goods. This is a humanitarian violation on a quite staggering scale”

Note Stephen Williams says he is informed by his visit to Gaza. Instead of doing collections for masajid extensions, use those funds to send more MP’s out to Gaza and the occupied territories of Palestine, let them see for themselves the situation with their own eyes and ears, instead of relying on press statements issued by Israel’s hasbara department.

“We have heard plenty of words, but they have been interspersed with violence. There have been conferences, accords, mutual recognitions, declarations of principles, assassinations, memorandums, elections, permanent status negotiations, unilateral withdrawals, intifadas, reports, ceasefires, peace initiatives, curfews, a so-called “security barrier” that separates families from their livelihoods and nomadic people from their land, rocket attacks, road maps, air strikes, incursions, prisoner exchanges-we have seen all that and more since 1991. We have heard many words, but we have seen many negative consequences and very little positive impact. UN resolutions have been ineffective and Israel has not been held accountable to international standards of conduct and law.”

Oh indeed Sandra, lip service has been all to common, it’s solid action not harsh words which are needed.

“I declare my interest: I am interested in Israel, I am the parliamentary chairman of the Conservative Friends of Israel and proud to be so. Everyone in this House should have an interest in Israel, because it is a country that embodies the values that we should stand for. It was created in the 1940s, partly as a reaction to the way in which the Jews were treated during the holocaust. Israel was created by the international community and it became a bastion of the rule of law, democracy, free speech, business enterprise and family values. If that is not what this country also stands for, I am disappointed.”

Need I say more?

Arbuthnot is Conservative Friends of Israel’s Parliamentary Chairman and Chairman of the Defence Select Committee.

“I would say to my hon. Friend Mrs Ellman and Mr Arbuthnot that, to get to the bottom of what happened on the Gaza flotilla, why can we not have an inquiry to international standards, run by the international community? What is the problem with that if we are to get to the truth?

There has been a lot of focus on Gaza today-rightly so; it is understandable in the circumstances-but let us not forget the west bank. Although there has been a partial easing of checkpoints and movement restrictions, it is still under occupation. Since the start of this year, there has been an escalation of attacks by settlers on Palestinians-up to 132. Land confiscations continue. Demolitions of homes continue. There has been a particularly pernicious systematic eviction of Palestinians who live in East Jerusalem from their homes-often virtually in sight of the United Kingdom consulate general.

If we are to bring such things to an end, we must do more than talk. It is time to say what action can begin to be effective. The European Union has an association agreement with Israel that carries not only rights but responsibilities. It carries the right to trade preferences and various other preferences, but it carries the responsibility of Israel abiding by standards of international humanitarian law. Israel is simply not abiding by those standards. The terms of the EU-Israel association agreement are not being carried out. Therefore, until Israel changes its attitude, that agreement needs to be suspended.”

Yes Richard I agree with you totally.

Sanctions are an excellent way of reprimanding Israel for its bellicose actions.

Boycotting, sanctions and divesting are what ended the apartheid regime in South Africa, and should be used against Israel, by a governmental level (don’t see it happening) and on an individual level.

“The first, fundamental duty of any Government is to safeguard their citizens and borders, and to look after their people at home and abroad. As we come up to the 70th anniversary of the battle of Britain, we may ask, who would have denied our nation the right and duty to safeguard ourselves against the Nazis? Who would condemn Britain’s historical roles, both in the middle east and blockading the African coast to enforce the abolition of slavery back in the 19th century?”

Bob is pretty delusional, talking about nazi’s, who is imposing collective punishment on whom?

“We must challenge the position taken on the flotilla and ask what its purpose was.”

Yes Bob, do go on

“Look at what happened on 31 May, particularly on the Mavi Marmara. Many of the individuals concerned appeared to wish to be martyrs to the great cause. They attacked Israeli soldiers-remember, Israeli soldiers were injured during the boarding, and the reality is that they were attacked with weapons.”

Bob, take that poster of Mark Regev off your wall.

Obviously myself and most of the world got it wrong, it was the israeli elite commando’s in their helicopters who were minding their own business and were stormed by gun toting maniacs who climbed up to the helicopter and proceeded to bash them with kitchen utensils…yes yes, that’s how it happened.

Be careful Bob, you are a newly appointed MP, The Akh helped to get rid of the zionist MP Dismore in Hendon, be careful what you say or I may just end up on your doorstep. After witnessing your performance first hand at the hustings, it wouldn’t take much to get the natives restless and get you kicked out on your rear.

“I wanted to take a little time to step back and tell the House why, ultimately, I count myself a friend of Israel, first and foremost, in the middle east. That is because I think of some fundamental truths. So let us be clear: for all its errors and excesses, which I and the whole House see, Israel is an oasis in a desert-an oasis of freedom, democracy and human rights in the middle east. We therefore have to ask ourselves, why does Israel do those things that shock, pain and worry us all? Why does it feel driven to inflict on the people of Gaza what we all recognise, whether in law or not, as seemingly like collective punishment? The answer is very simple: it is not just faced but encircled by an enemy that wishes to destroy it.”

Another ideologically driven zionist comes out of the woodwork.

“I was going to say something very different when I started listening to the debate, but after hearing Nick Boles talk about different countries’ rules, regulations and societies, I must say that that is no basis for invading, for killing or for destroying other people. One cannot say, “I’m a friend of Israel because it is a democracy.” We can be friends with Israel; I have no problem with the state of Israel. I welcome what my hon. Friend Mr Lewis said about the way to deal with the situation in the middle east. He said that the Palestinian people should receive land in proportion to their population. There should be an end to illegal settlements, and we should end the war, which has created so much misery for the Palestinian people.”

Well said Yasmin.

You may not like it, but this is the way that debates are framed and policy is formulated in Britain, a policy that effects millions around the world.

You have to ask yourself what you are doing to challenge the status quo.

Are any of these your elected representative?

Did your MP even bother to turn up at this debate?

Why aren’t your views being heard?

All Members of Parliament are public servants, and occasionally they need to be reminded of this fact, they are in their position to represent the points of view of their constituents.

The only way they can do this, is if you keep the pressure up on your local MP.

Give them the carrot and the stick approach.

Pressure politics, simple and plain!

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